Tag Archives: social development

FingerprintHeartCanvasSmThere’s just nothing like the love we have for our kids but are you sometimes at a loss for creative ways to express that so that they know, without a doubt, that they are loved to the moon and back? I happened upon today’s post at Popsugar.com and loved this reminder to be intentional in showing and telling kids just that. Here are just a few of the ideas you’ll find in the post.
1. I’m grateful for you.
6. You don’t have to be perfect to be great.
11. I believe in you.
12. This family wouldn’t be the same without you.
33. What you did was awesome.
55. You can try again tomorrow.
Don’t these take you to a happy, secure place just by reading them?! Read more at the link below and help your kids face the difficult things life throws at them.
( See 66 Positive Things You Should Be Saying to Your Child for the complete post)

I recently happened upon a fascinating yet easy idea by way of a simple blog post.  The Warm Fuzzy Jar described therein is a superb tool that can be easily implemented.  If you don’t want to buy pom poms, use painted rocks for heavens sake.  Just do it, like Nike says.  Take the time to at least skim the post from Hands Free Mama (see link below) and consider the lasting impression you have on your own kids and the kids you care for.  Here’s a short quote to give you a taste.DSC_0040-e1432856425292

“It became clear to me that constant corrections were not helping my children become more successful, more productive, more effective, or more fulfilled.  Being critical was hindering my children’s gifts and causing them to be unsure of their abilities. Criticism was diminishing their unique lights that made them who they are.”

Now, consider changing your kids’ lives by changing yourself first.  Here’s the link for the article in its entirety  http://www.handsfreemama.com/2013/05/29/how-to-fill-up-a-child/

I’ve highlighted some of these new picture books already but it’s nice to hear when others shower praise on them.  Pick on the book picture for detailed info about notable features of these titles.  Pick on the title of the book to purchase, or contact me today to find out how to get these books for free.

A TALE OF TWO BEASTS

Fiona Roberton  * 978-1-61067-361-7 * $12.99
Ages 5-9

Totally delightful.” – Kirkus Reviews,STARRED
“Cleverly crafted and told, this picture book explores points of view …” – Waking Brain Cells
“It’s a smart and not-too-serious introduction to the idea of empathy—and boundaries.” –Publishers Weekly

Bears Don’t Read!

Emma Chichester Clark * 978-1-61067-366-2 * $12.99
Ages 4-8

“Inherent to the story is the subtle message that there’s a difference between not being able to read and not wanting to read. …this will tickle pre-readers.” – Kirkus Reviews 

“Smoothly written and packed with dialogue, this disarming story will speak to kids who are learning to read, as well as those looking forward to gaining the skill.” – Booklist

“A delightful tale that cleverly demonstrates the joy of reading.” – School Library Journal

 

JESSICA’S BOX

Peter Carnavas * 978-1-61067-347-1 * $11.99
Ages 4-8

“The message is clear: Just be yourself, and friends will come.” – Kirkus Reviews

The solidly straightforward story arc, simple mixed-media illustration, effective use of color, and ample white space are all strengths.” – The Horn Book Magazine

“… this simple tale of the desire to make friends at a new school is so believable that one hardly notices that Jessica is in a wheelchair, and that is one of the book’s major strengths.” – School Library Journal

HERE IN THE GARDEN

Briony Stewart * 978-1-61067-348-8 * $11.99 * Ages 4-8

“A gentle story about the cycle of nature and dealing with loss.” – School Library Journal

“Stewart beautifully allows the book to speak to anyone who has experienced loss.” –Waking Brain Cells

SECRETS OF THE SEASHORE A SHINE-A-LIGHT BOOK

Carron Brown and Alyssa Nassner
978-1-61067-352-5 * $12.99 * Ages 4-8

Named a BANK STREET COLLEGE
BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR

“A diverting interactive introduction to several coastal species, from otters to oystercatchers.” – Publishers Weekly

Spotlight – Author / Illustrator Michelle Nelson-Schmidt

 

A little bit about me, Michelle Nelson-Schmidt

Hello! Thank you for coming to visit my rose-colored world!

I am Michelle Nelson-Schmidt, I live in Lilburn, Georgia and I have the great privilege of getting to be an author and illustrator for EDC Publishing. After about 10 years eeking my way towards that goal while working full-time as a mother and graphic designer, I am finally doing it full time. Sometimes I need to pinch myself when I realize that this is actually my life. I still sometimes look behind me to see the ‘author’ that a person next to me is talking about. I write and illustrate books for kids. Wow! THIS IS MY LIFE! I travel to schools all over the United States reading them my books, talking about my journey and encouraging them to follow their dreams – with everything they’ve got – no matter what! Because my life is magical, it truly is and every minute, even the doubting, painful ones were so worth it to get to here, I want every person I know and meet to understand that this life is meant to be magical – and we all can have a magical life. You just have to have the courage to look for it and work for it.

I love that I get to show my children and all the children I meet (over 350,000 now) that life is what you make it. That persistence and hard work will overcome almost any obstacle – and I of course have to make sure that they know reading is pretty much the key it all, no matter what your dream.

When I am not traveling I am busy being silly and having fun with the loves of my life – my husband Kevin, my son Noah, my daughter Sophia and our crazy dogs. They are all my everything and I love them more than bees love flowers!

She’s one of my favorite authors / illustrators.   Find out about Michelle’s books

Today I want to share a post from the Momastery blog because all kids need to hear this.  Yesterday Momastery posted a letter sent home with a child from a very caring teacher who absolutely ROCKS!  This shows why teachers are one of our nation’s most valuable resources.  Read below and then read it to your kids.  Not once or twice.  Every single time they hear the word “testing” they need to hear this until it’s ingrained in their hearts and minds.  Isn’t it absolutely fantastic?!  (See original Momastery post)

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Hug a doctor today!

10299931_10153162776332386_7918816044641186293_nOr at least hug your kids and share this title which explores what to expect at the doctor’s office and the work that doctors do to help us stay healthy.  One reviewer writes that this title is “ideally suited for reading to young children, for sharing ideas with slightly older children and being read by early readers.”   From the First Experiences series, you can see more about this and others in the series here.

 

Interesting and sneaky parenting tips from a recent Time Magazine article

6 Sneaky but Scientific Ways to Help Kids Learn

@katejleary

Jan. 22, 2015

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Anna Pekunova—Getty Images/Flickr RF

 

Parents want to teach kids the skills they’ll need to lead happy, productive lives. But we have too much to do and not enough time to do it. Ellen Galinsky, author of Mind in the Making: The Seven Essential Life Skills Every Child Needsacknowledges this “time famine” at the outset of her book, which is filled with evidence-based ways to help kids learn the skills they need. Here are a few of her suggestions. Chances are you’re already doing some of them. Now you can rest assured that research supports your methods, and maybe you can try a couple of new things. As Galinsky says, “we teach best when we are learning.”

  1. Play games backwards. For example, “Simon Says, Do the Opposite.” It’s the classic with a twist. If Simon says, “Be quiet,” the kids should be loud.

Why:
This helps kids practice inhibitory control, an important executive function. Executive functions also include focus, cognitive flexibility, and working memory. These skills predict academic success at least as well as IQ scores.

  1. Talk about feelings. Encourage your kids to talk about how they feel (She’s sad and frustrated that she left her new necklace at Grandma’s and won’t be able to get it back until next week. She’s also envious of her brother, who remembered his necklace.) Speculate about how others might feel, whether it’s in real life situations (Another driver cut you off, and that made you angry, but maybe that driver was having a terrible horrible no good very bad day) or in a book (Alexander was disappointed when the shoe store had exciting striped sneakers for his brothers but only white ones for him.)

Why:
This helps kids learn the skill of empathy. Kids who are able to understand what others are feeling and understand their intentions have smoother transitions to school, college and beyond because they can see others’ point of view.

  1. Tell Stories. Read. Talk about what you’re reading. Read to your kids, or ask them questions about their books. Tell stories. If you go to a friend’s house, encourage the kids to tell the story of the visit later. Family life is filled with what Betty Hart and Todd R. Risley call “business talk.” This kind of talk usually uses simple vocabulary and conveys what an adult wants from a kid. Storytelling and discussion of books uses richer language and is called “extra talk.”

Why:
It promotes good communication skills. In a survey Galinsky conducted, employers were most concerned about employees’ verbal and written communication skills. Extra talk correlates positively with academic performance. Of course, it might also be pleasant.

  1. Choose toys that have no point. Lego bricks, not sets. Or break up sets after the thrill wears off and see what your kid can make. Guide instead of taking over. (“It doesn’t seem to fit here? Where else could it go?”) Don’t wrest the brick from her hand even if you know you could make something cool.

Why:
This kind of play promotes object, space, and number sense, skills that help kids make connections. Information is easy to come by in the age of Google, but it’s of limited use if you can’t make creative connections.

  1. Write Out the Fights.You probably don’t feel like pulling out a notebook when the kids are fighting, but try Galinsky’s approach, supported by research and tested on her own kids. Collaborate with your family to:
  • Identify the dilemma.
  • Determine the goal
  • Generate a list of solutions. Go beyond your typical solutions.
  • Think about how these solutions might work, and not just the ones that were your idea.
  • Pick one and try it.
  • After you’ve tried it, discuss how the solution is working and either tweak or change the plan.

Why:
This process models critical thinking, which Galinsky defines as “[T]he ongoing search for valid and reliable knowledge to guide beliefs, decisions, and actions.” Life is packed with decisions to make and problems to solve, but in the short term, good critical thinking skills might help your kid judge when a friend is influencing him to make a mean-spirited or dangerous choice.

  1. Praise effort — not talent or intelligence. Instead of saying, “You got that problem right. You’re so smart,” say “You worked hard on those problems and you figured them out. That’s great.” Talk through how they deal with challenges and praise persistence.

Why:
Kids who receive this kind of praise are more likely to take on challenges. They have a “growth mindset,” which means that they see their abilities as something they can develop. This sets the stage for a lifelong interest in learning.

Continue reading Interesting and sneaky parenting tips from a recent Time Magazine article

My name is not actually Penny Dreadful. It is Penelope Jones. The Dreadful bit is my dad’s JOKE. But I do not see the funny side. Plus it is not even true that I am dreadful. It’s just that sometimes my BRILLIANT IDEAS™ don’t work out completely brilliantly. Like I didn’t mean for my cousin to end up bald and covered in superglue, and I also didn’t mean to steal our neighbour’s dog and make him speak Russian. It’s not my fault. I can’t help it. I’m just a Magnet for Disaster…   (for info about this series, see Penny Dreadful)

About the author, Joanna Nadin

I grew up in Saffron Walden in Essex, a small town, where nothing much happened, and where I spent an awful lot of time wishing I was somewhere else, or someone else. And that’s what I write about now – for children, teenagers and young adults: Extraordinary things happening to very ordinary people, in very ordinary places. And about dreaming of other lives you might live. Continue reading Author Spotlight: Joanna Nadin, author of brand new Penny Dreadful series

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The Pup’s Tale, the latest in the popular Pet Vet chapter book series for ages 7-11, tells the story of Tiny, the smallest pup in the litter.  The Pet Vet series includes six fun stories of lovable characters with pet facts throughout, available in either paperback or library binding.  You save when you purchase the Pet Vet Complete Collection.

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